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PAINTING NORTHERN SPIRIT FLUTES

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Overview

The Saskatchewan grade 4 social studies curriculum works beautifully with the smaller Indigenous D diatonic Style Northern Spirit Flutes. I work with a wonderful group of classroom teachers at École canadienne-française. I outlined what their students would be learning through making and playing the Indigenous Style North American flute. I invited them to take on the painting portion of the learning experience with their students. They were more than pleased to guide the students through the painting process.

 

Pre-teaching

Prior to painting the flutes, I use a class to help engage students in visioning and imagining what story they want their flute to tell. I show them photos of old traditionally made indigenous flutes, as well as some Northern Spirit Flutes students have made. I suggest they speak to their parents about their family’s history. I ask them to find out what is important to their family’s lineage and roots. I remind my students their flute will last for hundreds of years and can be passed down from generation to generation to their great, great grandchildren. I ask them to think of what message or story would they want to share with their relations into the future? I also try to remind them they should be painting something they would be proud to show their parents, grandparents and other people they respect now, as well. Because I live on Treaty Six land where a large part of the population is of Cree ancestry, I show student a Cree syllabics table. I explain how they could use these symbols to write their name on their flute.  I will also share a booklet with indigenous symbols and pictographs, included in the package I email to customers. There are flute design sheets in your package to use for this.

 

After the students have completed their design sheet, they are ready to begin sanding and undercoating their flutes. The Gesso dries very quickly and you could even start painting a base coat in the 1st class if students wanted.

PAINTING RULES & SEQUENCE

***DO NOT PAINT THE BIRD, TOP OF THE NEST OR MOUTHPIECE***

  1. Remove the lacing and bird. Put them in a zip lock bag and place in your desk for safekeeping. REPLACEMENT BIRDS  ARE EXPENSIVE.

  2. Tape over the mouthpiece and the top of the nest. ***Any paint that gets on top of the nest can create sound quality and tuning problems. The same thing goes for the bird. Students can use permanent markers as this will not interfere with the sound quiality and tuning of their flute.

  3. Sand the flute body with 220 grit sand paper until all the shine is off and it has a whitish tinge to the color. Wipe off the flute body with a wet cloth.

  4. Apply an undercoat of Gesso so the water based acrylic will have something to stick to.

  5. Paint the flutes. See suggestions below for ideas on how to do this in the most efficient manner.

  6. Topcoat the flutes.

  7. Re-assemble the flutes.

 

 

Being Efficient and Teaching Respect

I've learned a lot about being efficient with the painting process from many other teachers. I purchase little mini plastic cups and covers from the Great Canadian Superstore, the ones used for dipping sauces. I also purchase a bag of plastic knives to use for getting paint out of the little cups for mixing colours.  I then put 5 of the little cups together in half of an egg carton that acts as a holder for a group of 3 or 4 students. The night before we paint, I put a dab of red, yellow, blue, black and white (you can use Gesso for white) in each of the cups and put the lids on. I have this all ready to go ahead of time, so all the students need to do is get newspaper to cover their work area, paper towels, brushes and water to get started painting. It is then easy to add paint to any of their cups later if they run out.

 

Teach your students to use one knife for each colour when they scoop out paint so the colors do not get mixed in the cups. They should use their brush to do the mixing, no the knives. This will keep the colours clean for others to use and waste less paint. I find the paint keeps quite well in the little cups, so you can use it again over the course of a week without all of it drying up. I also take time to teach them how to clean their brushes and don't let them put them away until I've inspected them. I have ended up with some lazy students who do not clean the brushes very well and try to put them away dirty. I am strict about this part of things to teach respect and responsibility. I like to put on a CD of some beautiful Native American Flute music while your painting and tell the students to let their imagination take them to new and wonderful places. 

 

The final step is to topcoat the flute with a water base varathane or a similar product to protect the finish. I recommend two to three thin coats. Be sure the 1st coat is dry before doing each subsequent coat. If you paint before the paint or varathane are dry enough, you can make the colours run o peel off the first layer of topcoat and make a mess of your flute.

 

 

FAUX FINISH by James Tong  

   

This work is quite amazing. When James sent me photos of the painting he had done with his flutes, I was just blown away! The flutes looked so much like wood, I had to keep zooming in to see the detail in the work. And the finish still looked like wood!  Thank you for sharing James.

Process 

 

Tape off any areas such as the mouth piece prior to the finishing process.

 

I utilize rough sandpaper or a dremel type tool with a similar sanding wheel and go up and down length wise to create the grain. The heaviness of the grain is of individual taste. Follow up with smooth sandpaper (preferred dry wall sanding blocks) go over the area you have to smooth out the overall surface and bring out the desired grain pattern.

 

Wash and rinse the prepared flute thoroughly with warm soapy water to remove the sanding dust and oil or chemicals from ones hands.

 

I utilize everyday furniture touchup pens in various shades that are available at most hardware stores and big-box stores. Check out the available brands, I find the cheapest ones work best. Some of them may soften the plastic/resin initially. Usually once they have dried and aired well the surface re-hardens.

 

Avoid finishing the area where one blows. On white flutes I usually use a non-toxic spray paint or if finished I cover the area with a non-toxic acrylic sealer.

 

Take the marking pen(s) and run them in strokes up and down the flute with the grain. Overlap strokes to give variation of shade to the faux wood finish. Brown paint or any paint for that matter can also be used and has a different effect. It’s a matter of preference.

I usually put two to three coats on the flute depending on the material color below.

 

Final finish I sand very lightly with fine sandpaper (D/W Sanding Block) to give a consistent and smoother surface.Clean the flute again thoroughly.Once dried, I seal with a non-toxic acrylic sealer, semi-gloss preferred, gloss if you like a real shiny instrument.Flat is usually too dull.

 

You can also antique the finish by giving a light coat of semi-gloss black on a finished flute. Once thoroughly dried sand off the black paint and leave some of it to high light the grain and instrument. Clean and seal again.

 

My fellow journeyers are amazed by your flutes and how well they play. One of the Sensei’s (Sandokai Karate) will be contacting you shortly.

 

I still excitedly await the Lakota and E flutes. I shall also be ordering another flute shortly. I finished and gifted the last one to the headmaster of Sandokai Karate.

 

Thanks again and May you always Walk in Beauty.

 

Jimmy Tong (azchimp)